wireless house alarms

A domestic space odysseyBy Donna J. Jodhan The times they are definitely changing and from what we are seeing, retirees are moving in with their adult children as part of a shifting landscape. In Britain this is happening and across Europe they are following suit. In North America this trend seems to be a bit more sluggish but many are saying that it will only be a matter of time before it starts to take off. This trend has been given a quick start by the present economic crisis and families are doing this in order to cope. What we will probably see is a change in what we call the family.

fire detection alarm

01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

In the market we can find many more such cameras which are specific to purpose. Door and window sensors are also another key invention in home safety and security. These work on the basic principle of infrared, that is when a door or a window is opened and the infrared sensor is cut without prior intimation to the system, the security alarm goes off and alerts the concerned party of an abnormality in situation. This is very useful when people fear of break ins via windows and doors in the house. These security system can also be combined with other sensors like motion sensor and fire and smoke alarm sensor, finger print recognition, doorbell view camera etc. these security system can further be programmed to contact the police department and your personal guardian immediately in case of an emergency at home.

home automation and security

01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

Amazon's promotional videos show people lurking around homes, and the company recently posted a job opening for a managing news editor to "deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors. ""Amazon is profiting off of fear," said Chris Gilliard, an English professor at Michigan's Macomb Community College and a prominent critic of Ring and other technology that he says can reinforce race barriers. Part of the strategy seems to be selling the cameras "where the fear of crime is more real than the actual existence of crime. "In this Thursday, June 20, 2019, image made from video, Chris Gilliard speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at an office in Dearborn, Mich. Gilliard is an English professor at Michigan’s Macomb Community College and a prominent critic of Ring and other technology that he says can reinforce race barriers and discrimination. AP Photo/Mike HouseholderThe cameras offer a wide view from wherever they are positioned.